The Roll of Honour and Appendices support the book, One-Two-Three.  Due to practical space constraints in the book, and to simplify the discovery of information about the officers and men who served in the 123rd Battalion, Royal Grenadiers, the Roll of Honour and Appendices are available here as fully downloadable and searchable PDF files.

Comments are invited.


The Roll of Honour shows the names and details of all of the officers and men who served with the 123rd Battalion, Royal Grenadiers that died of causes related to their service between 1915 and 1924, including men serving with other units at the time of their death.
—>   Roll of Honour


Appendix 1 gives the meaning of the Acronyms and Abbreviations used in the Book and can also be found on page 339.
—>   Appendix 1


Appendix 2 contains the Nominal Roll of Officers and Men that sailed with the 123rd Battalion from Halifax on August 9, 1916 on the S.S. Cameronia and SS Metagama enroute to Liverpool, England.
—>   Appendix 2


Appendix 3 contains the Nominal Roll of Officers and Men that sailed with the 123rd Battalion from Folkestone England on March 9, 1917 aboard the troop ship S.S. Invicta to Bourlon-Sur-Mer France.
—>  Appendix 3


Appendix 4 contains the Nominal Roll of Officers and Warrant Officers serving with the 123rd Battalion on May 25, 1918, just before the reorganization of the Engineering Branch.
—>  Appendix 4


Appendix 5 contains the lists of battle casualties suffered by men who had previously served with the 123rd Battalion after the reorganization of the Engineer Branch in May 1918. The 123rd Battalion, Royal Grenadiers formed the framework for the creation of the 7th, 8th and 9th Canadian Engineer Battalions of the 3rd Engineer Brigade, from May 31, 1918 to the end of the Great War. NOTE: This Appendix is a work in progress and will be updated from time to time.
—>  Appendix 5


Appendix 6 is a chart that shows the structure of the formations of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  The Section was the smallest organizational unit, made up of approximately 10 men. The Corps was the largest organizational unit, and constituted the whole of the Canadian Overseas Forces during the Great War. Throughout the War, the Canadian Corps reported through the British Army structure, although they achieved significant independence for strategy and tactics starting in May 1917, thanks to the military brilliance of the Canadian Commander, Lieutenant-General Sir Arthur Currie.
—>  Appendix 6


Appendix 7 is a full roster of all of the officers and men who served with the 123rd Battalion, Royal Grenadiers, at any time during the Great War.
–> Appendix 7


Appendix 8 is a list of the illustrations and images in the book that can be used as a convenient finding aid.
–> Appendix 8